30 Minutes in the Life: April 2020

In the 2020….. (How does the song go “In the year 2525, if man is still alive
If woman can survive ~ Zager, Evens”).  Earlier today I saw someone added an “in the year 2020…” a Facebook post with the idea that this would come up in their memories.

So what does Corona Virus Stay at home look like for you?  For me, it is still work as normal, in fact a little more than normal, but it has to be done so I am going to do it.

Richard has his office downstairs, I have my office upstairs.  Hoodini (the quaker parakeet I rescued) is moved out of my office into the spare room every morning, Ms Moo sits at the closed door whining to get in and Sims just ignores everyone and everything.  That is us, day in and day out, work and Zoom meetings make up my days.  Sunday evening we have managed to set up a Zoom games evening with the kids who are not close by.  It adds a little variety.  When necessary I will go to the shop, but so far I have managed to keep that to once a week.  I have been out of the house a total of 6 times in the last 5 weeks.

So for this month, my 30 minutes is really my editing time.  I thought I would get us on the road again.  We traveled a fair bit the last two years, and I found I was not able to keep up with the editing on all the trips.  Today I am going to go back to Maine, and a charming town that I got to visit with a friend.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0810

My friend Karen had married and moved to New Hampshire a few years ago.  When we decided to go up that way I connected with her to see if we could meet.  I also knew she spent a lot of time hiking in New Hampshire and I thought I would pick her brains on where to go.  She went one step further.  She decided to drive through to Maine and we went on a road trip.  First to the Ogunquit Musuem, then stopped by a lighthouse, then drove through to Portsmouth.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0811

This is a quaint little seaside town.  All of them are quaint to me.  Not sure how little they are though.  But for me the immediate town was so interesting.  I love the old brownstone buildings and the cobblestone pavers or brick sidewalks.  Today was an overcast day but luckily when we arrived in Portsmouth it stopped raining.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018:9768

The first stop was at a small street side bar called Portsmouth Gas Light Co, for lunch.  Of course, when in the north we had to have lobster rolls (and this was a first for me, both being in the north and the lobster rolls).  Karen and I shared and I can promise you that was more than enough food.  When I compare it to the ridiculous lobster roll we got in New York, this is amazing.  It tasted it good, and it was super filling.  Added to that we were able to indulge in the local brew.  I am a Heineken kind of person, and they were able to come up with a brew that matched my taste.  If you are in town, I highly recommend stopping by.   

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0826

Another favorite of mine is street art, and we managed to find a few interesting murals to capture our attention.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0827

Walking the city was fun, and we soon headed down to the Piscataqua River that separates Portsmouth, New Hampshire from Kittery, Maine.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0834

We found a beautiful garden square that was a riot of color, carefully planned out and very appealing to the eye.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0835

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0837

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0840

We continued on crossing one of the local traffic bridges and walk along the waters edge enjoying the beautiful sites in front of us.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0844

The image below caught my attention because of the beautiful reflections in the water.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0845

We landed up along a quay of yachts and fishing boats which may or may not have been situated on North Mill Pond.  It’s been over a year, what can I say.  The bridge in the image is called the Memorial Bridge and it is a vertical lift bridge.  This bridge allows commercial boats to pass through.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0847

This bridge replaced an earlier built bridge that spanned this river from 1923 to 2012.  On the original bridge there was a plaque that read “Memorial to the Sailors and Soldiers of New Hampshire who gave their lives in the World War 1917–1919.”  This plaque was moved to the newly built bridge.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0849

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0858

We headed down to the Strawberry Banke Museum, side stepping into a historical grave site area.  I am a big fan of wandering through, reading the different tombstones.  I love history and these tombstones were very interesting in design.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018:

The tombstone about was that of Capt Tobias Lear who died November 6th, 1781.  According to the notes found on an onsite notice board, “Lear was a mariner of Portsmouth whose home, now a historic site, is a few blocks from Point of Graves on Hunkering Street.  His son Tobias Jr, Served as President George Washington’s private secretary.  The elder Lear’s gravestone was carved by John Homer and displays the realistic skull and cross bones for which he is known“.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0866

Another one that had clear writings on was the tombstone of Mary Blagdon. The tombstone says “Here lies the body of Mrs Mary Blagdon wife to Doc. Samuel Blagdon Aged 75 years.  Died Dec y 11th 1735.  I found the images on the tombstone interesting and wondered who chose the design on this woman’s tombstone.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018:

We passed the South Meetinghouse on Macy Street.  The building of this beautiful building was completed in 1866, and in those days cost $9,600-00 to complete.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0879

We walked down some side streets and this stairway caught my attention with all it’s number plates on it.  It certainly was creative, as was the front door of another house we passed.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0880

We found two new friends (for a short period of time) sunning themselves outside now that the rain had gone.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018:

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018:

We walked passed some alley ways where I captured this beautiful spiral staircase.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0890

And then we were back at the water’s edge, having walked along a boardwalk of restaurants.  I loved looking at the tug boards and fire rescue boats.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 0896

In the distance we could see the Memorial Bridge we had walked past earlier.  We were on the other side of the bridge looking down towards it.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 9776

In the opposite direction is the stunning Piscataqua River Bridge which spans the Piscataqua River.  The bridge connects Portsmouth. New Hampshire with Kittery, Maine.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018:

The bridge has 6 lanes and arches high above the river, eliminating the need for a lift bridge for boats.  The structure is this incredible mass of metal work that is absolutely stunning.

Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts:  September 2018: 9445

Thank you for joining me for 30 Minutes in the Life, and for traveling with me through this this small but oh so interesting seaside town. I hope you enjoyed getting out and about with me.  I look forward to the day we can pack up the suitcase and head out again.  I am still holding out hope for my Eastern European trip in August. 

Just a reminder that this is a circle blog.  I would encourage you to take some time to visit my very talented friend Janet of Janet Crouch Photography and see what she has for you this month.  Check out her Facebook  and Instagram pages as well. 
30 minutes contributor

8 Comments on “30 Minutes in the Life: April 2020

    • Thank you Stacey. The gardens were stunning and for a cobble stone kind of town there was definitely a lot of color.

      Like

  1. This is another bucket list location for me… and that lobster roll seals the deal. There is something about New England that is just so charming. You captured it beautifully!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Kristina – The lobster roll is one thing that would get me back there again. It was a fun little town to visit.

      Like

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