Tell me a story: May 2016

Tell me a Story is live.  Each month we are given a quote to base our photographs on .  The quote for May is:

“Learn to get in touch with the silence within yourself,
and know that everything in this life has a purpose.”
~ Elizabeth Kubler Ross.
One of the best places for me to silence myself is to take a walk in the wetlands.  I typically go in the middle of the day when there is not too many people around.  This time, however, I actually went early.  I was out of the house by 7:30am.  Downside about that, is, so is everyone else.  Between the photographers and the speed walkers, the area got a little hectic.
I have a tendency to zone out.  I just want to meander at my own pace and stop and take in the beauty. The wetlands is one of the places where I see that everything in life has a purpose.  The dragonfly eat the mosquitos and bugs, the lizards and birds eat the dragonfly, bigger birds and gators eat the smaller birds and so the cycle of life goes on.
Walk with me as I meander, clearing my head from the busyness of the previous week.  I am quiet and I am methodically slow.  In my head is a small list of images that I am looking out for.  Other than that I am doing my best to be quiet.
Walking in the wetlands - Tricolored Heron

The first Bird I come across with an adult Tri-colored Heron.  It is nesting season in the wetlands and so the first thing I am looking for is whether there are babies.  Sadly there were not so I meander on.

Woodstork and chicks

The Woodstorks have taken over at the first rest pavilion area.  In previous years the Great Blue Heron’s would nest there however over the last 3 years the Woodstorks have moved in and not left much space for other birds to build their nests.

Walking in the wetlands - spider web

I am always fascinated by spider webs, spider definitely less so.  The colors in this image really appealed to me.

Walking in the wetlands - An Egyptian Goose

I don’t often get to see an Egyptian Goose, however, I recently had one visit my back canal a few weeks ago.  These bird bring back memories of my youth and a friends mother feeding them.  They are beautiful birds and a pleasure to see.

The Ignuana is an alien species to the wetlands.

The Iguana is an alien species to the wetlands.  Whenever we visit the Florida Keys they seem to be in abundance.  In the wetlands there are less of them.  This one is a small iguana.  There are definitely some that are much bigger.  The interesting thing about iguana’s is that they change from this green color to orange color when in mating season.

Walking in the wetlands

Wildflowers and bees are hard to catch because the bee barely sits still for two seconds.  I think I probably took 20 images just to get this one.

Wild flowers amidst the various shades of grasses.

Wild flowers amidst the various shades of grasses.

Walking in the wetlands

This is one of the most interest plants I have seen in the wetlands. The Cephalanthus occidentalis (Common buttonbush) is apparently part of the coffee family.

I love this walkway and today I pulled out my lensbaby composer pro with a soft focus optic, to see what I could get. I do love the effect of the lensbaby images.

I love this walkway and today I pulled out my Lensbaby composer pro with a soft focus optic, to see what I could get. I do love the effect of the Lensbaby images.

Finding the light

I spotted this small frame of light and remembered that one of the group I am in focuses on finding the light.  This one worked for that theme.

There are new chicks on the block. Three Tri-colored Herons were hanging out today . This little one was sitting all by iteself. I love how it's legs are all stretched out in front of him.

There are new chicks on the block. Three Tri-colored Herons were hanging out today . This little one was sitting all by itself.  I love how it’s legs are all stretched out in front of him.

And here is the previous Tri-colored Heron's partners in crime. These babies are a welcome sight at the wetlands.

And here is the previous Tri-colored Heron’s partners in crime. These babies are a welcome sight at the wetlands.

This Cormorant hangs out in the wetlands, and while I am not as close as I seem to be, it is not afraid when you walk past it. It watches you with it's beady until but never flys away. The beady eye of the Cormorant is a beautiful turquoise.

This Cormorant hangs out in the wetlands, and while I am not as close as I seem to be, it is not afraid when you walk past it. It watches you with it’s beady until you pass but it rarely flies away. The beady eye of the Cormorant is a beautiful turquoise.

Walking in the wetlands

I spotted the outer petal of the pond apple flower lying on the wooden railing.  The narrow depth of field is one of my favorite styles of taking an image. I love the sharpness with the contrasting blur.

This Stilt had created a nest in a "dry" spot due to low levels of water. However, we have had some increase in the water level. She laid and was nesting on 4 eggs. Friday I got to see them which was a rare treat. Sadly a young resident gator must have discovered the nest on Friday afternoon or Saturday. By Saturday mid morning the Stilts had gone and the 4 eggs had disappeared and the gator was hanging out.

This Stilt had created a nest in a “dry” spot due to low levels of water. However, we have had some increase in the water level. She laid and was nesting on 4 eggs.

Stilt sitting on what looks like 4 eggs. She kept getting up and turning them this morning

While I was watching the female Stilt, she kept getting up and moving the eggs.  My understanding was that they were due to hatch within a couple of days.

This Stilt had created a nest in a "dry" spot due to low levels of water. However, we have had some increase in the water level. She laid and was nesting on 4 eggs. Friday I got to see them which was a rare treat. Sadly a young resident gator must have discovered the nest on Friday afternoon or Saturday. By Saturday mid morning the Stilts had gone and the 4 eggs had disappeared and the gator was hanging out.

Sadly a young resident gator must have discovered the nest on Friday afternoon or Saturday. By Saturday mid morning the Stilts had gone and the 4 eggs had disappeared and the gator was hanging out.  It is a rare treat to see a Stilt up close and I was saddened about the loss of the eggs.

I do believe that this Aligator was the cause of the demise of the Stilt eggs. The good news is the parents are building a new nest. The bad news is that the silly things are building it in a similar area.

I do believe that this Alligator was the cause of the demise of the Stilt eggs. The good news is the parents are building a new nest. The bad news is that the silly Stilts are building it in a similar area. I guess they did not learn.

Thank you for joining me for this month’s Tell me a story.    This is a circle blog.  Please take time to visit my fellow blogger Beth Williams and see what she has for you this month. Keep following the circle to see what the other photographers have shared this month. Don’t forget to leave a little love on their pages.

If you are interested in seeing more of my photography take a look at my Facebook page, my Flickr Page or my Instagram Page.  

3 Comments on “Tell me a story: May 2016

    • Thank you – it was one of mine as well – sad end to that day, but another pair have recently had 4 chicks and another pair is sitting on at least 3 eggs. So that makes me a little happier.

      Like

  1. Pingback: Soccer Season 2016 Spring (done) – LUPJi Photography

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