30 Minutes in the Life: January 2021: Sunset

So, January is practically over. It has been a tumultuous start to the year, just when I thought things were going to be better for all of us. Some days I just need to get away from it all. For the most part I am hibernating in my office working fortunately. Aside from the virus, and the political stuff, my daughter and her husband packed up their apartment in preparation for it being sold, and along with their 2 cats, moved into our house. So we are a family of 4 adults, 4 cats and 1 bird. My Ms Moo is not a happy cat right now. She is scared of her shadow and now Amy’s two cats are stalking her. She is in hiding most of the time. Snow has also taking to staring down the bird.

In addition, I joined 52 Frames. So this is my 4th project 52 for the year. I feel like my goal so far is to get out and take the photo’s I need for each week. This weeks theme was water. There is a great pond up at the national park that I love to take photos at. So Thursday evening I packed up 5 lens (17-40 mm, 28-135 mm, 70-300 mm, 150-600 mm & Lensbaby Sweet 135) and I headed up to the park to check out the owl, take photo’s of the pond and watch the sunset. While our property backs up to the edge of the Everglades there is no access into the area from our home. We are also separated by two small canals.

In the end my 52 Frames image was taken at the sunset and I will post it here as it is the only image in black and white.

The owl was high up in the tree so it is really hard to see him that well. The female is in the nest and she seems to sit behind the main part of the tree. This was the best I could get of him.

It always fascinates me how the the setting sun changes so much. I started out at the pond and the light was this golden brown color.

I headed down to the water line at the edge of the Everglades and I really did not think this was going to be a great evening. The cloud was thick and low and I was not going to bet the full sun. It felt dark and sort of dingy for a sunset. I also did not realize that I had moved my FStop to 9. Obviously I must have done it up near the owl. I started out with the Lensbaby Sweet 35. One of my P52’s is to use the Lensbaby Optics that are taking up space in my lens drawer.

Lensbay Sweet 35
Lensbaby Sweet 35

From here on out it was a case of changing lens to get wide angle, a bit closer, much closer and super close. One of my favorite things that typically happen at sunset is the birds flying by. Quite often, although it did not happen this evening, you get to watch the murmuration of the grackles and that is a beautiful dance in the sky. Below is a flock of Ibis flying by.

28-135 mm
Lensbaby Sweet 35

People aside, we often get a number of different species, below is the Great Blue Heron.

150-600 mm

Fly by’s happen fast and you have to keep watching. Below is a larger flock of Ibis, all heading south. I would love to know where that land up each evening. I have no idea what bird is in the second image below, but chances are it was a slow moving Ibis.

70-300 mm
70-300 mm
70-300 mm
28-135 mm
28-135 mm

Grackles will fly into the area in the hundreds. On Thursday there were not that many but I was so glad I had brought up with beast with me to get in super close.

150-600 mm
150-600 mm

What was pretty neat was that the Grackles on the edge of the water were taking a bath at sunset. Hence the first image and the water drops.

150-600 mm

As the sun got lower the sky got more reddish orange and really intense.

70-300 mm

More Ibis below as the sun is setting. From the silhouette, the birds in the second image look like a flock of cattle egret.

70-300 mm
70-300 mm

At this point I kind of figured the sun was done, and the mosquito were going to be out shortly, so I headed back to my car. I could not resist turning around to take a silhouette.

28-135 mm

Halfway done the ramp, I discovered my friend walking up. She told me not to leave, she wanted to talk to me, and she convinced me that the final rays would get better. Sometimes they do, sometimes they don’t. This time it certainly did. The sky lit up and I was so glad that she told me to stay.

28-135 mm
28-135 mm
17-40 mm

Nothing like kayaking at sunset in a alligator infested water. Oh yes, there are often alligators swimming in the water.

17-40 mm

Finally the mosquito’s got to much for us and we headed back to the car. I managed to capture the last silhouette before diving into my car, with a couple of mosquito for company. Nothing like being bitten all the way home.

70-300 mm

The Florida Everglades is a grassy, slow moving river, a natural marshland, which is habitat to hundreds of animals. There are various different different areas to the Everglades. There are the mangroves at the coast, the sawgrass marshlands and the pine flatwoods. You will find endangered species like manatee, American crocodile, and the Florida Panther.

This particular park, that I go to, has walking trails, and it would not be uncommon to have an alligator cross the trail in front of you. I recently saw Turkey Vulture eating a dead animal. There is a lot of birdlife if you get out and walk, and the owls have come in to nest. Two weeks ago there was a pair of mating Sandhill Cranes. There are also Bobcat in the park.

The walking in the area is great. I managed to get out and do a two mile walk but I was constantly watching for Alligator on the edge of the banks. I didn’t see Alligator but I did see a great big iguana. Unlike the wetlands, here we are on the same level as the Alligator.

When the bushes behind out house were cut short we used to be able to see the deer running along the edge of the Everglades past our home.

The park is great for walking, however, my this is by far my favorite spot to go and watch the sunset.

Thank you for joining me for 30 Minutes in the Life. I would encourage you to take some time to visit my very talented friend Stacy of Threadbarems. You will definitely love what she shares. I am always inspired with what she has to offer.

12 Comments on “30 Minutes in the Life: January 2021: Sunset

  1. Sharleen, I love this post! Before you even mentioned alligators I was thinking..”how in the world is she not afraid that an alligator is about to show up?” My husband watches Swamp People and they’re always catching alligators and pythons in waters just like this! Absolutely beautiful images! Your sunsets and details are so pretty. What a great talent you have for capturing nature! I’ve considered a lensbaby but the manual focus and my not so good eyesight scares me a bit.

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    • Thank you Janet. I do keep a healthy look out when I am walking in there. We have kayaked the route but it is not fun when the water gets really shallow. I am not one for getting out and pushing the boat in alligator water. Half the time using the lensbaby I am not 100% sure that my focal point is where it should be but I still love the effect.

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  2. Pingback: 30 Minutes in the Life: January 2021

  3. These are absolutely beautiful! We visited the everglades back in 2012 on our way to Key West. Fortunately I check the areas closely when we plan vacation. So glad we did not miss the opportunity to see just a little bit of what the everglades are all about. However, no sunset photos. These are amazing! ❣❣

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  4. Wow. These are gorgeous! Incredible sunset. Alligators scare me to death… I know they are not as bad as crocodiles… but still. I lived south of Houston, Texas for 16 1/2 years – and never got used to them nor snakes. Yikes! Visited the Everglades last February – such an amazing place! We took a swamp boat tour.
    I am on 52 Frames too. I will have to look you up.
    Love your blog circle!

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    • Thank you so much. I hope you find me on 52 Frames – Let me know you stopped by. I will look out for you. Fortunately Alligators are a little bit more timid that Crocs. I grew up with Crocs and they are not something you play with. I remember camping in the Transkei and bathing in the river mouth. Talk about stupid, that’s where the Crocs typically hang out. Happily we survived to tell the tale. πŸ™‚

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